Books on Structural and Personal Racism: Favorites I Read in 2018

By Karyn Pomerantz, January 2019

Selected non-fiction books that provide an analysis of racism in US history. Continue reading “Books on Structural and Personal Racism: Favorites I Read in 2018”

BOOK REVIEW: STAMPED FROM THE BEGINNING

slavery

by Ellen Isaacs

Stamped From the Beginning by Ibram Kendi is indeed, as it claims to be, a very complete history of the origin and practice of anti-black racism in the United States. The story begins with the development of racist ideas of African inferiority as the rationale for the capture and brutalization of Africans for enslavement by the Portugese in the 1400s. The author then traces the history of the importation of these racist ideas to the Americas to justify slavery and the continuation of discrimination to this day. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: STAMPED FROM THE BEGINNING”

Left of Karl Marx: The Political Life of Black Communist Claudia Jones (review)

claudia jones book coverClaudia Jones: Revolutionary Communist

 by Sarah Harper and Karyn Pomerantz, September 9, 2018

Introduction

This blog post is part of a series that briefly reviews the immense contributions of black revolutionaries fighting racism and capitalism, primarily in the United States during the early to the mid-20th Century. Continue reading “Left of Karl Marx: The Political Life of Black Communist Claudia Jones (review)”

Black Communists Fight Racism with Multiracial Solidarity Part 2, Paul Robeson

by Karyn Pomerantz, October 19, 2017

Introduction

This series of blog posts reviews the immense contributions of black revolutionaries fighting racism and capitalism, primarily in the United States during the early to the mid-20th Century. Continue reading “Black Communists Fight Racism with Multiracial Solidarity Part 2, Paul Robeson”

Black Communists Fight Racism with Multiracial Solidarity

Written by Karyn Pomerantz, September 17, 2017

 Introduction

This series of blog posts reviews the immense contributions of black revolutionaries fighting racism and capitalism, primarily in the United States during the early to the mid-20th Century. Continue reading “Black Communists Fight Racism with Multiracial Solidarity”

How Slavery in the Fields and Factories Created King Cotton and Capitalism

A Book Review by Karyn Pomerantz of : The Empire of Cotton: A Global History by Sven Beckert.  London, Penguin Books 2014.

 

cotton pickingThe cultivation of cotton and the production of cotton materials, made profitable by racist slavery and genocide, birthed capitalism.   The Empire of Cotton describes the history of cotton production from before the Christian era through present day outsourcing to Asian sweat shops heavily staffed by impoverished women and children.  Mexico, Brazil, India, China and Egypt also grew cotton yet never developed any new economic structures to maximize its value as England did. Continue reading “How Slavery in the Fields and Factories Created King Cotton and Capitalism”

THE U.S. GOVERNMENT CREATED AND/OR PERPETUATED SEGREGATED HOUSING – WITH MALICE AND FORETHOUGHT

 

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The original HOLC map of New Orleans. High “risk” black areas in red.

A Book Review

by Ellen Isaacs

 

“Racial segregation in housing was not merely a project of Southerners in the former slaveholding Confederacy. It was a nationwide project of the federal government in the twentieth century, designed and implemented by its most liberal leaders….Until the last quarter of [that century}, racially explicit policies of federal, state, and local governments defined where whites and African Americans should live….The policy was so systematic and forceful that is effects endure to the present time.” These quotes are from the preface to The Color of Law, a new book by Richard Rothstein, that presents a wealth of evidence in support of his thesis. The general ignorance of the history of de jure (by law) segregation is so profound that Chief Justice John Roberts could get away with saying that since residential segregation “is a product not of state action but of private choices, it does not have constitutional implications.” Such ideas inhibit legal remedies for the consequences of housing segregation, such as segregated education. The author also shows how racist housing laws contributed to income differentials, the large differences in wealth between blacks and whites, and prevented interracial cohesion. Continue reading “THE U.S. GOVERNMENT CREATED AND/OR PERPETUATED SEGREGATED HOUSING – WITH MALICE AND FORETHOUGHT”